Roman camp Oesterholz

Roman camp Oesterholz


The Roman camp Oesterholz is located at the intersection of the north-south road Senner Hellweg (Sennerandstraße) with the west-east road Westphalian Hellweg. That these roads were also already used by the Romans indicate the Roman camp Sennestadt on the Senner Hellweg and the narrow pass Grosse Egge (before the modern era, here a wagon fleet whose axles had a standardized track width of 1.40 m had cut tracks into the rock) as a part of the Westphalian Hellweg. From the Roman camp today only the northwestern part can be recognized, and this only by means of digital terrain model (DTM) cards, such as the one provided by TIM-online:

Northwestern wall of the Roman camp Oesterholz in the DTM view
Fig. 1: Northwestern wall of the Roman camp Oesterholz in the DTM view (TIM-online) with the distinctive rounded corner (abgerundete Ecke)

Die Dimension des Walls gleicht der des am Senner Hellweg 15 römische Meilen (=22,2 km) weiter nördlich gelegenen Römerlagers Sennestadt:

Comparison of the dimensions of the walls of the Roman camp Sennestadt and Roman camp Oesterholz
Fig. 2: Comparison of the dimensions of the walls of the Roman camp Sennestadt and Roman camp Oesterholz (TIM-online)

For Download: the corresponding TIM-Online Project, to be opened with https://www.tim-online.nrw.de/tim-online2/, Extras | Import Projekt.


The Google Map with the marked wall of the Roman camp Oesterholz:

Google Map with the marked wall of the Roman camp Oesterholz
Fig. 3: Google Map with the marked wall of the Roman camp Oesterholz (Link)

With the naked eye, there is nothing left on the wall to be recognized:

Roman camp Oesterholz western wall, view from the southern end of the still preserved wall in a northerly direction
Fig. 4: Roman camp Oesterholz western wall (marked yellow-red), view from the southern end of the still preserved wall in a northerly direction (high resolution)


Roman camp Oesterholz western wall, view from the rounded corner of the still preserved wall in a southerly direction
Fig. 5: Roman camp Oesterholz western wall (marked yellow-red), view from the rounded corner of the still preserved wall in a southerly direction (high resolution)


Roman camp Oesterholz northern wall, view from the rounded corner of the still preserved wall in an easterly direction
Fig. 6: Roman camp Oesterholz northern wall (marked yellow-red), view from the rounded corner of the still preserved wall in an easterly direction (high resolution)


Video Roman camp Oesterholz
Vid. 1: Wall of the Roman camp Oesterholz, view from the rounded corner, swiveling from a southerly direction towards an easterly direction


The southern part of the camp is destroyed by plowing, a fate which the Roman camp Oesterholz is likely to share with the vast majority of Roman camps in Germania. At the end of the still recognizable part of the northern wall, the terrain begins to rise noticeably to the east, possibly the wall here was much more eroded (flow movement of the soil on a slope) and is therefore no longer displayed in the DTM.
 
Up.